neighborly take on banana bread

August 13th, 2009 by admin Leave a reply »

You’re not supposed to eat before doing yoga. But when your neighbor brings you mini banana muffins with chocolate chips still warm from the oven, that’s a rule that’s meant to be broken. Right?

Well, last night, let’s just say I had three mini banana muffins before doing a YogaMazing podcast.

Carter devoured the last two mini banana muffins for breakfast (after he rejected my last attempt at banana muffins as “too chocolately”).

Speaking of rules, the funny thing is that Nandini breaks a bunch of baking ones, but still ends up with delicious results. For instance, because she likes to use just one bowl, she doesn’t bother to sift dry ingredients separately. For these muffins, she just creamed the butter and sugar, and then mixed in the rest of the ingredients.

Nandini’s Mini Banana Muffins
1 cup sugar
1/2 cup butter
1 egg
1 cup mashed bananas
2 cups flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
5 tablespoons milk
1/2 cup chocolate chips

Preheat over to 350F degrees. Coat a 24-cup mini muffin pan with cooking spray.

In a large bowl, cream sugar and butter. Mix in the egg and the banana. Add the dry ingredients (flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt—can be sifted together first) and mix until just combined. Stir in milk. Fold in chocolate chips.

Spoon batter into mini muffin pan. Bake until tops brown and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean, approximately 15 minutes. Deliver warm to neighbors.

Adapted from Banana Bread V from AllRecipes.com

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2 comments

  1. Nandini says:

    actually, i break the rules for most things i cook. some turn out better than others! never understood the whole sifting thing. more work. more clean up. maybe you can explain?

    these muffins work work well even with streamlined instructions…

  2. admin says:

    At its heart, baking is chemistry. Sifting together the dry ingredients aerates the flour and evenly distributes the leavening agents, usually baking powder and/or baking soda, which cause the chemical reactions responsible for baked goods rising.

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